New Puerto Rico Content Available!

We’re excited to announce that our first batch of Puerto Rican newspapers for this cycle is now up in Chronicling America! This batch contains content for one of our new titles, La democracia from July 1891-Nov 1897.

La democracia was founded and published by the Puerto Rican poet, journalist and politician Luis Muñoz Rivera. It was first published in Ponce, Puerto Rico in 1890.

The paper supported the Autonomist Party of Puerto Rico, was against the imposition of taxes on products (especially sugar), and was in favor of the Farmers Association and Agriculture Bank. The paper published news related to land repossessions, the Foraker Act (1900), Cuban relations (life in, emigration, revolution, and tobacco), the Dingley Tariff Act (increase on import tax for sugar, tobacco, other goods), and the Russo-Japanese war. La democracia also provided a glimpse into life on the island and included notes on celebrations of US Holidays, advertisements for local brands, reported on the new coat of arms, and made frequent reports about feminism and changes to the civil code.

We’ve included a few examples below of the content that is now available online.


 

Estamos emocionados de anunciar que nuestro primer lote de periódicos puertorriqueños para este ciclo ya está en Chronicling America! Este lote contiene contenido para uno de nuestros nuevos títulos, La democracia de julio de 1891 a noviembre de 1897.

La democracia fue fundada y publicada por el poeta puertorriqueño, periodista y político Luis Muñoz Rivera. Fue publicado por primera vez en Ponce, Puerto Rico en 1890.

El documento apoyaba al Partido Autonomista de Puerto Rico, estaba en contra de la imposición de impuestos a los productos (especialmente el azúcar), y estaba a favor de la Asociación de Agricultores y Banco Agrícola. El periódico publicó noticias relacionadas con las tomas de tierra, Foraker Act (1900), las relaciones cubanas (vida en, emigración, revolución y tabaco), Dingley Tariff Act (aumento del impuesto de importación de azúcar, tabaco y otros bienes) y la Guerra ruso-japonesa. La democracia también ofreció un vistazo a la vida en la isla e incluyó notas sobre las celebraciones de las vacaciones de Estados Unidos, anuncios de marcas locales, informó sobre el nuevo escudo de armas e hizo frecuentes informes sobre el feminismo y cambios en el código civil.

Hemos incluido algunos ejemplos a continuación del contenido que ahora está disponible en línea.

 

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La democracia, front page July 9, 1891

 

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Scott’s Emulsion Ad, September 18, 1894. Scott’s Emulsion is a U.S. brand (multivitamin) that is still around.

 

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Revolution attempts in Cuba, March 21, 1895

 

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On April 22, 1895La democracia changed its masthead from “Diario politico” to “Diario autonomista independiente”.

 

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In support of the Partido Autonomista, February 18, 1897

 

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Snippet of a story about Luis Munoz Rivera, November 4, 1897

Pre-digitization

The time has come again to start reviewing microfilm for our project! After selecting the titles to be digitized for this round, we place an order with company that houses our master negatives to have selected reels duplicated. These reels are then mailed to us to be reviewed for quality and completeness. This review process not only consists of noting the quality of the filmed newspapers but also compiling information (metadata) that will contribute to what information and how this information is displayed in Chronicling America and our digital collections here at the University of Florida. We call this process “collating” and make note of things such as title, changes in title, issue dates, how many pages each issue has, if an issue is missing, if pages of a certain issue are missing, etc. The film and their corresponding collation sheets are then sent to a vendor, who digitizes the content and delivers the digital material (on external hard drives) to us on a monthly basis.

The Florida newspaper title we decided to start with this phase was the Pensacola Journal. We worked on digitizing some of this title during Phase I and wanted to finish digitizing the run (an estimated 25,000pages). We anticipate having this newly digitized content available beginning in June 2016. This content will be available for free viewing on Chronicling America and the Florida Digital Newspaper Library.

 

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100 duplicate microfilm reels to be used for our digitization project. These reels only contain Florida content and include the titles: Pensacola Journal, Ocala Banner, Daytona Daily News, and Lakeland Evening Telegram.

 

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Strip of microfilm. Neat view of what the filmed newspaper pages look like pre-digitization.

 

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The microfilm machine (ScanPro3000) that we use to view the content on the reels.

 

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Screenshot of the program used to view the newspapers on reels. Displayed is a partial view of an issue of the Pensacola Journal.

 

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“Sneak-peek” of the first issue to be digitize this phase: the Pensacola Journal January 1, 1915.

 

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Screenshot of an Excel sheet used while collating.

 

Celebrating Chronicling America’s 10 Million Pages

October 7, 2015

UF Libraries’ Florida and Puerto Rico Newspaper Project Celebrates Contributions

to Chronicling America’s 10 Million Pages

Free, searchable database of historic newspapers reflects Florida & Puerto Rico history

The University of Florida and the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras today join the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities in celebrating a major milestone for Chronicling America, a free, searchable database of historic U.S. newspapers. The Library announced today that more than 10 million pages have been posted to the site, which includes news from Florida related to the development of the citrus industry, natural disasters, wartime development and other historic events. News from Puerto Rico related to commerce, industry, agriculture, the Spanish America War and more can also be found in Chronicling America.

Launched by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in 2007, Chronicling America provides enhanced and permanent access to historically significant newspapers published in the United States between 1836 and 1922. It is part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a joint effort between the two agencies and partners in 40 states and territories.

The NDNP awards grants to entities in each state and territory to identify and digitize historic newspaper content. Awardees receive NEH funding to select and digitize 100,000 pages of historic newspapers published in their states between 1836 and 1922. Uniform technical specifications are provided to ensure consistency of all content, and digital files are transferred to the Library of Congress for long-term management and access. The first awards were made in 2005. Since then, NEH has awarded more than $30 million in support of the project.

The UF George A. Smathers Libraries was awarded an NEH grant in 2013 to collaborate with the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras to digitize historic newspapers from Florida and Puerto Rico that are currently on aging microfilm. In August 2015, the Smathers Libraries received a supplemental award from the NEH to digitize additional content. The total award of $613,000 provides funding support for the “Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project”, which is part of the state and territory’s involvement in the NDNP.

“Because these pages are not just on microfilm anymore, it completely changes the access. Anybody with an Internet connection can see them,” said project director Patrick Reakes, the UF libraries’ Associate Dean of Scholarly Resources and Services. “It’s also a more sustainable way to preserve them. Microfilm gets old and brittle and hard to read. Once these pages are digitized, they’re safe. They’ll still be readable in the future.”

“Chronicling America is one of the great online treasures, a remarkable window into our history and a testament to the power of collaborative efforts among cultural institutions nationwide,” said Mark Sweeney, the Library of Congress Associate Librarian for Library Services. “The Library of Congress is proud to work alongside NEH and all our partner institutions to make this vision a growing reality. In the coming years, we look forward to adding newspapers from the remaining states and territories, as new partners join the program.”

“We at the National Endowment for the Humanities are proud to support the Chronicling America historic newspaper project,” said NEH Chairman William Adams. “This invaluable resource preserves and makes available to all the first draft of America’s history so that we can see the ideas and events that shaped our republic unfold in the headlines of their times.”

While newspapers are frequently available for general use through microfilm and can be shared among users by interlibrary loan or purchasing copies, digitizing pages and providing full-text keyword access to the content is transformative for research of all kinds. In addition to saving researchers hours of scrolling through reels of microfilm, full-text access allows users to discover connections between research topics and uncover little-known stories in American history. The Chronicling America site includes a broad, curated set of newspapers selected for their historical value that users can browse or search. Through a few clicks they can narrow their focus to newspapers published all on the same day, in the same region, or the entire country. In addition, the content in Chronicling America is available for bulk download and API use, fostering new research approaches through computational and linguistic analysis.

 

Chronicling America Facts:

  • Between January and December 2014, the site logged 3.8 million visits and 41.7 million page views;
  • The resource includes more than 285,000 pages in almost 100 non-English newspapers (French, German, Italian and Spanish);
  • More than 250 Recommended Topics pages have been created, offering a gateway to exploration for users at any level. Topics include presidential assassinations, historic events such as the sinking of the Titanic, inventions and famous individuals such as the Wright Brothers, and cultural or offbeat subjects such as fashion trends, ping-pong and world’s fairs;
  • NEH has awarded a total of more than $30 million in grants to 40 partner institutions to contribute to Chronicling America, listed at http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/awards/;

About the Library of Congress: Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation’s first-established federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world. It seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs, publications and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at loc.gov.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating its 50th anniversary as an independent federal agency in 2015, National Endowment for the Humanities brings the best in humanities research, public programs, education, and preservation projects to the American people. To date, NEH has awarded $5 billion in grants to build the nation’s cultural capital – at museums, libraries, colleges and universities, archives, and historical societies – and advance our understanding and appreciation of history, literature, philosophy, and language. Learn more at neh.gov.

Introduction

Welcome!

The Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project(FPRDNP) is a collaboration between the University of Florida Smathers Libraries and the library at the University of Puerto Rico– Rio Piedras, as part of the state and territory’s involvement in the NDNP.

The National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a partnership between the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress, is a long-term effort to provide permanent, free access to historic newspapers selected and digitized by NEH-funded awardees in the United States. This program was created to build upon the United States Newspaper Program (USNP), another NEH & Library of Congress sponsored program geared toward locating, cataloging, and preserving microfilm newspapers published in the U.S. from the 18th Century to present. The NDNP extends the usefulness of the USNP’s digitized assets by incorporating newspapers published from 1836-1922 into a national digital newspaper resource, Chronicling America, where the digitized pages are made available. Through this resource over 9 million newspaper pages have been made available thus far.

The University of Florida was one of the original NDNP awardees in 2005 when the program first started. Approximately 100,000 pages of Florida newspapers published between 1900-1910 were digitized and incorporated into Chronicling America. The George A. Smathers Libraries was awarded another NEH grant of $325,000 in 2013 to collaborate with the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras and provide financial support for the Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project. As of August 2015, NEH awarded the FLPRDNP another $288,000 to digitize an additional 110,000 pages from both Florida and Puerto Rico. The completed project will provide free, internet-based access to newspapers that are currently available only on aging microfilm. The digitized papers will be available through the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America, the University of Florida Libraries’ Florida Digital Newspaper Library, and the Biblioteca Digital Puertorriqueña at the University of Puerto Rico.

Stay tuned for more, right here on our blog!

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Check out our webpage ufdc.ufl.edu/ndnp

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